England education – CV New Eng http://cvneweng.org/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 05:17:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://cvneweng.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-52-120x120.png England education – CV New Eng http://cvneweng.org/ 32 32 Higher technical education belongs to FE – let’s show why https://cvneweng.org/higher-technical-education-belongs-to-fe-lets-show-why/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 10:22:00 +0000 https://cvneweng.org/higher-technical-education-belongs-to-fe-lets-show-why/ Research project will advocate for colleges offering higher technical education, writes Ian Pretty Earlier this year, the government announced its intention to improve the standard of technical education in the UK by publishing the Skills for Jobs white paper (often referred to as the FE white paper). In this document, the government specifically highlights the […]]]>


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Reimburse students affected by strikes at English universities, watchdog says | Higher Education https://cvneweng.org/reimburse-students-affected-by-strikes-at-english-universities-watchdog-says-higher-education/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 20:57:00 +0000 https://cvneweng.org/reimburse-students-affected-by-strikes-at-english-universities-watchdog-says-higher-education/ English universities should consider partially refunding tuition fees if students see their classes disrupted by strikes on campuses this week, the student watch body said. Nicola Dandridge, head of the Office for Students, the higher education regulatory body in England, said universities affected by the industrial action should compensate for any disruption. “Universities are subject […]]]>

English universities should consider partially refunding tuition fees if students see their classes disrupted by strikes on campuses this week, the student watch body said.

Nicola Dandridge, head of the Office for Students, the higher education regulatory body in England, said universities affected by the industrial action should compensate for any disruption.

“Universities are subject to consumer protection law, and they should think about how they will compensate for any disruption caused by industrial action,” Dandridge said. “This may include postponing any missed instruction, presenting course topics in a different way, or determining the desirability of partial tuition reimbursements. Students should not be academically disadvantaged due to any disruption. “

Pickets erupted in 58 universities on Wednesday morning at the start of a three-day walkout by members of the Union of Universities and Colleges, after a double ballot on proposed cuts in pensions, wages and working conditions.

Staff at 33 institutions are taking action on the two disputes, four on pensions alone and 21 on wages and working conditions. UCU members at six other universities supported non-strike actions, including contract labor.

Union members include technicians, university administrators, librarians and researchers, as well as lecturers and teachers.

The UCU said employers, represented by Universities UK and the University and Colleges Employers Association, refused to lift pension cuts and tackle falling wages and deteriorating working conditions, such as l ‘use of extended short-term contracts for teaching staff.

Raj Jethwa, Managing Director of UCEA, said: “We respect the right of employees to take legal industrial action, but it is unrealistic and misleading for their members that the UCU asks them to lose three days’ wages in the pursuit of an unrealistic salary demand of 7% to only more than a third of higher education institutions in collective remuneration schemes.

Jo Grady, UCU General Secretary, said: “While university directors doubted the staff’s determination to improve the higher education sector, the number of striking staff today proves that they are seriously mistaken.

“Thousands of dedicated university staff and students are on the picket lines, attending protests and marching to demand fair wages, decent pensions and better working conditions.

“The level of action seen today is just the start and university directors must now wake up and respond to very modest staff demands. Otherwise, the potential for more widespread and escalating industrial action in the New Year becomes very real. “

A group of student activists called the Red Square Movement on Wednesday blocked Universities UK offices in support of the strike.

The National Student Union has offered its support by advising students not to cross picket lines.

The strikes are likely to affect more than a million undergraduate and postgraduate students in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland, and more than 100,000 enrolled at Open University.

Dandridge said she was “extremely concerned” about the potential impact of the strikes on students. “The students went through an exceptionally difficult time. It cannot be fair that they face further disruption, and we urge employers and unions to work quickly so that no labor disputes materially affect students. “


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Miami hosts international conference on education https://cvneweng.org/miami-hosts-international-conference-on-education/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 16:10:00 +0000 https://cvneweng.org/miami-hosts-international-conference-on-education/ The Armstrong Student Center at the University of Miami opened its doors to educators around the world from November 18-20 for the 40th Annual Lilly Conference, an event for faculty and others in higher education careers to share their learning research. The Miami Lilly Lecture, dubbed the original Lilly Lecture, began as a three-year program […]]]>

The Armstrong Student Center at the University of Miami opened its doors to educators around the world from November 18-20 for the 40th Annual Lilly Conference, an event for faculty and others in higher education careers to share their learning research.

The Miami Lilly Lecture, dubbed the original Lilly Lecture, began as a three-year program funded by the Lilly Pharmaceutical Company in 1979 to support early career faculty. The original program included six universities, but as funding ended in 1981, faculty in Miami requested an extended endowment to expand the conference.

Milton Cox, founder and director emeritus of the Original Lilly Conference, said the company did not have the funds to continue supporting the program but allowed Miami to host the annual conference under the same name.

“Our first conference was at the Shriver Center,” Cox said. “There were maybe a couple of people from Ball State and Bowling Green who came over, and the rest were professors from Miami.”

The following year, the Marcum Center had completed construction, and the Lilly Conference welcomed 35 professors from other campuses.

Since then, the conference has grown internationally, welcoming educators from Canada, England and Australia. The conference has also branched out to host events in other locations including San Diego, Austin, Texas, Asheville, North Carolina and even Hong Kong.

Cox said he hasn’t missed a conference since its inception.

“I’ve been to hundreds,” Cox said. “It’s really important for me to keep the connection with Miami, the original conference and all the other conferences. “

This year, 275 educators attended the conference, including one from Nigeria.

Lilly Conference attendees spend three days listening to lectures, learning about new higher education publications, and presenting their own research and findings about teaching in college classrooms.

On Friday evening, several dozen faculty members gathered in the Fritz Pavilion to learn about their mutual experiences in higher education and how to implement new techniques in their own teaching.

Professors Tracy Parson and Cheryl Shultz traveled to Oxford from Lorain County Community College in Ohio to present their findings on the impact of virtual education during the pandemic on nursing students.

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“We presented our work to our college last August for our faculty development days, and one of our colleagues encouraged us to bring it here to the Lilly Conference,” Parson said.

Shultz said that in addition to providing lots of food, from salads to chocolate bars, the conference was also a good way to network with other educators from different disciplines and schools.

“We got to sit down with a lot of nice people,” said Shultz. “It was good because the number of people you speak with is diverse. “

Lamia Scherzinger, senior lecturer at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, said she heard about the conference when she was working in Miami in 2015. As an online educator, her experience was relevant. . She presented how different types of learners work in online environments.

Despite the impact of COVID-19 – guests were expected to adhere to Miami’s mask policy and international involvement was down from previous years – Scherzinger said his experience was still positive.

“It was one of the best conferences I have attended,” Scherzinger said. “The topics were very timely, very engaging and the presenters were very passionate as teachers and educators, not just as researchers. “

The conference wasn’t all business, however. Gregg Wentzell, director of the Lilly conference, said the three-day affair included several events beyond lectures and presentations, including a trivia night in the Red Zone and live entertainment in the Shade Family Room. .

“We have… all kinds of categories, from higher education to science to a potpourri category, which is a lot of fun,” Wentzell said. “It creates a good bond, a little friendly competition. We also have musical entertainment by people from Lilly.

Even with fun and games, the goal of the Lilly Conference remains the same as it was 40 years ago: to encourage interdisciplinary learning among faculty members so that they can provide a better education to their students.

“People don’t just sit and listen to come and speak,” Wentzell said. “It’s much more of an active learning approach to sessions. They will present the research… then they will engage participants in different types of activities and discussions.

For Megan Mefford, a College of Pharmacy attendee at Ohio State University, interacting with a range of faculty experts at the Lilly Conference paid off.

“I mainly focused on science, so these are very scientific lectures, and you hear really interesting lectures, but it’s not something you can apply,” Mefford said. “[These are] immediately applicable things that you can go back and implement tomorrow. This is the most useful conference I have ever attended.

scottsr2@miamioh.edu


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‘Humble’ Redditch teacher shortlisted for best education award https://cvneweng.org/humble-redditch-teacher-shortlisted-for-best-education-award/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 16:21:56 +0000 https://cvneweng.org/humble-redditch-teacher-shortlisted-for-best-education-award/ A REDDITCH teacher said he was “completely speechless” after being nominated for a Worcestershire Education Award. Mark Abbott, third and fourth grade teacher at St George’s C of E First School, was named teacher of the year. Mark, who has been teaching for 15 years, was appointed by Tarryn Golding, who recently moved to Redditch. […]]]>

A REDDITCH teacher said he was “completely speechless” after being nominated for a Worcestershire Education Award.

Mark Abbott, third and fourth grade teacher at St George’s C of E First School, was named teacher of the year.

Mark, who has been teaching for 15 years, was appointed by Tarryn Golding, who recently moved to Redditch.

“Mr. Abbot deserves to win this award because he made us feel welcome and helped my son settle into the new school very quickly,” Tarryn said.

“We had just moved to Redditch in August 2020 during the pandemic and my son has special needs and was undergoing assessments at the time.

“In his previous school he never felt out of place, but with Mr. Abbott he finally felt like he belonged somewhere and he couldn’t wait to go to school.

“He took the time to make sure my son understood the work offered to him in class when he struggled to understand some tasks.

“If my son got agitated or frustrated, he defecated by the time he met and supported him, which is hard to do when you have 15 other kids in class.

“He’s a very humble person, and I would often say thank you and he would quickly say that you don’t need that too, but I am doing it because he changed my son’s life.”

Responding to the nomination, Mark, who is also the Mathematics Officer at St George’s, said: “I am totally speechless, I am really touched.

“I am very lucky to have one of the best jobs in the world.

“It sounds like a cliché, but I’m just doing my job.

“I don’t think I’m doing more or less than the teachers at St George’s. We all do it because we care about ourselves.

We have partnered again with the University of Worcester to renew our education awards in all of our titles – Worcester News, Redditch Advertiser, Bromsgrove Advertiser, The Shuttle and Evesham Journal – which recognize and celebrate hard work, passion , the quality and dedication of our educational institutions in Worcestershire.

Nominations can be made by visiting the awards section on the advertiser’s website to submit suggestions in any of the categories that range from Director of the Year to Lockdown Hero.

If your company or organization would like to sponsor any of the awards, contact dale.godliman@newsquest.co.uk


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Parents forced to step into the educational gap | Education https://cvneweng.org/parents-forced-to-step-into-the-educational-gap-education/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 18:18:00 +0000 https://cvneweng.org/parents-forced-to-step-into-the-educational-gap-education/ Government cuts, cuts, cuts and underfunds schools and special education services, then authorities are surprised when the number of home schooling increases (councils in England report 34% increase in education at home optional, November 24)? Your headline might have been better to read: “34% Increase in Caring Parents Fixing Government Failures.”Claire QuarmanWindsor, Berkshire It was […]]]>

Government cuts, cuts, cuts and underfunds schools and special education services, then authorities are surprised when the number of home schooling increases (councils in England report 34% increase in education at home optional, November 24)? Your headline might have been better to read: “34% Increase in Caring Parents Fixing Government Failures.”
Claire Quarman
Windsor, Berkshire

It was impossible to watch the Prime Minister’s speech (The Political Skit, November 22) without remembering David Brent’s motivational speech to a similar audience of stone-faced businessmen in The Office.
Andrew Hope
Oxford

The repatriation of the plundered Greek sculptures (the Parthenon marbles should never have been removed, writes Boris Johnson on November 23) would surely make the headlines: “Johnson has lost his marbles”.
David Feintuck
Lewes, East Sussex

John Beck is asking for suggestions from a broadcaster with the accountability authority (Letters, November 24). Channel 4 News does exactly that, over and over.
Rod Warrington
Upton-by-Chester, Cheshire

Like many readers (Letters, November 24), I have some old food in my cupboard, including a tin of duck cassoulet, bought in Paris in the 1990s. I intend to eat it before I die. . Probably just before.
Liz fuller
London

Got an opinion on everything you’ve read in The Guardian today? Please E-mail us your letter and it will be considered for publication.


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Tom Elmes: “Education is above all important” | The COYGIG capsule https://cvneweng.org/tom-elmes-education-is-above-all-important-the-coygig-capsule/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 15:14:18 +0000 https://cvneweng.org/tom-elmes-education-is-above-all-important-the-coygig-capsule/ Republic of Ireland assistant coach Tom Elmes believes it is vital for players to have an education to fall back on before turning pro. Professional football is still new to many young women. Although there are opportunities in Ireland, most women end up playing professional football in England, Europe or America. The smaller, but growing, […]]]>

Republic of Ireland assistant coach Tom Elmes believes it is vital for players to have an education to fall back on before turning pro.

Professional football is still new to many young women. Although there are opportunities in Ireland, most women end up playing professional football in England, Europe or America.

The smaller, but growing, number of professional female footballers in women’s football means that it is even more important for female athletes to ensure that they have an education to rely on.

Speaking on this week’s episode of The COYGIG podcast, Elmes discussed the importance of building a career outside of football.

“I can’t stress how important this is,” Elmes said. “I think young players should have an education to build on. You are generally talking about the percentage of players who actually make it to that next level.

“Women’s football is developing at a very rapid pace, so more and more women players are exposed to opportunities in the UK.

“The dropout is going to be just as important in the women’s game in the end [as it is in the male game]. However, women who drop out are unlikely to have earned the money their male counterparts could have earned.

“So that can make it very difficult for them. If we can support our young players with education above all, that is very important.”

Many Irish athletes are currently studying abroad. While acknowledging that this is a way to both travel and learn life skills, Elmes also pointed out that there are also educational opportunities for athletes to stay in Ireland.

“Some choose to do it in the United States,” Elmes said. “There are some great experiences to be had there, if that’s what they want to do, and to travel, you can do it.

“You now see many courses offering sports scholarships. Opportunities for players to stay and play in this country. We see a number of institutions aligning with National League clubs.

“This kind of joint approach helps the teams to make themselves known to the players, they bring them in regularly, train in a good environment.

“From an education standpoint, we’re making sure our players get that on their side.”

Education is important so that players have something to fall back on

Amber Barrett, who joined The COYGIG podcast Last week.

Barrett now plays professional football in England after graduating from school. Elmes thinks Barrett and others should be inspired on how to do both.

“If you can do both and combine the two at the same time, I think it will be better for you,” Elmes said. “You shouldn’t always be in a rush to get into professional football.

“If it’s there, it’s a tough decision to make at the time. Amber [Barrett] mentioned it. She’s in professional football now and she loves it. There are other players who are in similar positions.

“They’ve all gone and graduated and their education is behind them. When the time comes when they reach the end of their playing career, or their career is cut short, they have that to fall back on. I think that it’s really important.”

The COYGIG Pod on OTB Sports in association with Cadbury FC, official partner of the Republic of Ireland Women’s National Team.

Download the all new OTB Sports app in the Play Store and App Store now! We have what you need!

Subscribe to OTB Sports’ YouTube channel for more videos, like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter
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Academics support creation of pan-Irish higher education space https://cvneweng.org/academics-support-creation-of-pan-irish-higher-education-space/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 00:32:33 +0000 https://cvneweng.org/academics-support-creation-of-pan-irish-higher-education-space/ Greater cross-border collaboration in higher education will be fundamental for “peace and prosperity” in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, according to academics. A task force set up by a pan-Irish scholarly society, the Royal Irish Academy, calls on the Irish government and the Northern Ireland executive to strengthen research and education ties to […]]]>

Greater cross-border collaboration in higher education will be fundamental for “peace and prosperity” in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, according to academics.

A task force set up by a pan-Irish scholarly society, the Royal Irish Academy, calls on the Irish government and the Northern Ireland executive to strengthen research and education ties to overcome challenges historical political and regional policies, as well as the problems caused by Brexit and the coronavirus pandemic.

A series of reports proposes the creation of an island-wide charter on equality, diversity and inclusion that would combine existing targets and initiatives such as Athena Swan and the republic framework for consent, which deals with sexual harassment and misconduct, with an advisory board that sets goals, makes recommendations and monitors progress.

Such a coordinated strategy would eliminate gaps in the focus on gender, religion, race, language, ethnicity, disability and LGBTQ + issues, argues the academy.

They also call for the establishment of an island-wide Research and Innovation Advisory Council, providing independent policy advice and assessment in both jurisdictions. This could help avoid the duplication of “expensive resources and capital infrastructure”, allowing universities to build on their strengths instead. In such a system, institutions should declare their research priorities and areas of expertise “in a way that allows for clarity”.

The advisory board could also consider creating a higher education and research space across Ireland, facilitating greater student mobility, reports suggest, suggesting this could build on the experience of the Nordic countries which have established similar agreements between the European Union and non-EU member states.

Another recommendation is a planning body for the northwest of the island, a historically underfunded area. This could potentially involve the creation of a cross-border university, initially proposed in 2020.

Along with these cross-border initiatives, the documents also call for more investment in research by the two governments and the creation of a body to oversee higher education in Northern Ireland, as it is the only region from UK without one.

Both parts of Ireland have faced funding restrictions over the past decade. In Northern Ireland, fees are capped at £ 4,275, compared with £ 9,250 in England, and Stormont – who has just emerged from political paralysis over the division of power between Unionists and Republicans – has turned out unwilling to make up the difference.

Universities in the Republic, where tuition is free, had to contend with a decade of budgetary constraints even before Covid-19 reached the vital income of international students and commercial income.

Cross-border initiatives have garnered very strong support in the academy’s consultation submissions, according to Gerry McKenna, senior vice-president of the RIA and former vice-chancellor of the University of Ulster. Although some cross-border initiatives already exist, stronger engagement was needed, he said.

“By their very nature, higher education and research do not really respect borders. It’s an international activity, ”said Professor McKenna. “In a relatively small island like Ireland, any false division that hinders cooperation and collaboration comes to the detriment of both sides of the island, regardless of their political outlook.

“Universities are an important actor in terms of promoting social cohesion, promoting political tolerance and supporting democratic institutions themselves. It is not something we should take for granted.

“A higher education system that encompasses the entire island and all of its regions is an important factor in promoting not only prosperity, but also peace and stability. “

anna.mckie@timeshighereducation.com


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World Rugby launches brain health education campaign for elite players https://cvneweng.org/world-rugby-launches-brain-health-education-campaign-for-elite-players/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 19:10:00 +0000 https://cvneweng.org/world-rugby-launches-brain-health-education-campaign-for-elite-players/ Rugby Union – Autumn International – Ireland v New Zealand – Aviva Stadium, Dublin, Republic of Ireland – November 13, 2021 General view of the rugby balls before the REUTERS / Clodagh Kilcoyne match Nov. 17 (Reuters) – World Rugby on Wednesday launched an education campaign to raise awareness of brain health in sports and […]]]>

Rugby Union – Autumn International – Ireland v New Zealand – Aviva Stadium, Dublin, Republic of Ireland – November 13, 2021 General view of the rugby balls before the REUTERS / Clodagh Kilcoyne match

Nov. 17 (Reuters) – World Rugby on Wednesday launched an education campaign to raise awareness of brain health in sports and set up a network of free brain health clinics for former elite players.

The Brain Health Initiative, supported by national unions and the International Rugby Players’ Association, includes an educational video where independent experts describe 12 risk factors for dementia.

These include lack of physical activity, lack of social contact, depression, heart disease, brain damage, and heavy drinking.

A group of former rugby players filed a class action lawsuit against World Rugby and other governing bodies in December, alleging that their failure to protect them resulted in an early onset of dementia.

“I have been saddened by the recent and courageous accounts from former players about their experiences. As a former player myself, I understand that some players may be concerned about their brain health,” said the chairman of World Rugby, Bill Beaumont, captain of England and the British and Irish Lions.

Beaumont said providing high-quality care and support by setting up clinics around the world would allow members of the rugby family to get better education on brain health.

“It’s about building community, starting conversations and understanding how we can all make lifestyle changes that can have a positive impact on our long-term well-being,” added Beaumont.

World Rugby also announced guidelines this year limiting full contact training to 15 minutes per week.

Reporting by Hritika Sharma in Bengaluru, editing by Ed Osmond

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.


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Majority of education staff, parents and students support GCSE reform – survey https://cvneweng.org/majority-of-education-staff-parents-and-students-support-gcse-reform-survey/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 00:01:00 +0000 https://cvneweng.org/majority-of-education-staff-parents-and-students-support-gcse-reform-survey/ The majority of education staff, parents and students believe GCSEs need to be reformed, a survey suggests. More than half (54%) say GCSEs need “serious reform” and 40% think they need “some tweaking” because they are not perfect, according to principals’ conference research (HMC). The results come after the cancellation of exams for the second […]]]>

The majority of education staff, parents and students believe GCSEs need to be reformed, a survey suggests.

More than half (54%) say GCSEs need “serious reform” and 40% think they need “some tweaking” because they are not perfect, according to principals’ conference research (HMC).

The results come after the cancellation of exams for the second year in a row prompted some education officials and politicians to call on ministers to consider reforming GCSEs in the post-Covid years.

A report released by HMC, which represents hundreds of private school leaders, suggests that there is “significant concern” in the public and independent sectors that the program and assessment “are failing to meet the needs of young people. »And to develop basic skills. .

He adds that the findings suggest that the current assessment is “too focused and misused” and that exams are more successful in serving the goals of academic selection and employers than “encouraging the development of learners or to motivate engagement in education ”.

The poll – of 789 school leaders, teachers, parents, students, academic staff and other education workers – suggests that 54% think a consultation on GCSE reform should be launched “as soon as possible”.

Meanwhile, an additional 35% said the consultation should begin after “a period of consolidation of Covid-19”.

The report calls on the government to appoint a non-partisan person or organization to lead an independent consultation on widespread reform of curriculum and assessment models.

He adds that further investigation is needed into how the current education system contributes to the exclusion of different demographic groups.

The online survey, which was carried out in July, suggests that only 5% of respondents strongly agree that the current education system encourages the acquisition of skills for work.

Report author Sarah Fletcher, grandmother of St Paul’s Girls’ School and chair of HMC’s Assessment Reform Task Force, said survey respondents are clear that the education system is “lagging behind”.

Addressing the findings, she said: “In their opinion, the program is not sufficiently relevant or motivating. The assessment appears to focus more on benchmarking and university selection needs than student progression, and there is real concern about inclusion. “

Ms. Fletcher added, “There is a real appetite within the teaching community to address these issues and soon.

“The overwhelming belief is that politicians should give way to professionals, allowing review and reform to be led by those at the forefront of education – teachers, academics, researchers, welfare experts. be and young people leaving school.

“The challenges we face in the 21st century and the framework in which we work have changed beyond recognition and now we must reset the dial. “

In September, the Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL) requested that the number of GCSE graduation exams taken during the students’ last summer at school be reduced.

Meanwhile, in July, The Times reported that former Prime Minister Sir John Major had called for reform of the examination system because he disliked GCSEs due to the “stress and tension they impose on students “.

The HMC report calls on teachers and educators to be at the heart of any assessment reform.

Richard Backhouse, President of HMC and Principal of the Berkhamsted School, said: “This report describes the clamor in the education sector to shape an education system that reflects the needs of 21st century Britain and I urge members of government to read it.

A spokesperson for the Ministry of Education said, “We want every young person to benefit from a broad and balanced curriculum that helps them thrive and realize their potential.

“Our reformed GCSEs rigorously assess the knowledge acquired by students and meet the standards expected in countries with efficient education systems.

“They have been strengthened based on feedback from higher and further education institutions and employers to ensure that young people leave school or college prepared for work and higher education. “


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5 reasons to pursue higher education in Scotland https://cvneweng.org/5-reasons-to-pursue-higher-education-in-scotland/ https://cvneweng.org/5-reasons-to-pursue-higher-education-in-scotland/#respond Wed, 10 Nov 2021 07:13:22 +0000 https://cvneweng.org/5-reasons-to-pursue-higher-education-in-scotland/ I don’t think there should be a lot of debate about why one should study in Scotland. It is a beautiful country with a picturesque landscape, a long history, a friendly local culture, delicious food and an excellent modern lifestyle. There is almost everything needed for the overall development of the students. Of course, the […]]]>

I don’t think there should be a lot of debate about why one should study in Scotland. It is a beautiful country with a picturesque landscape, a long history, a friendly local culture, delicious food and an excellent modern lifestyle. There is almost everything needed for the overall development of the students. Of course, the quality of universities and colleges matters most, but there is no doubt about it. Why? Because they have always been the top ranked. Yet while most of you are aware of these benefits, I intend to tell you more about them.

Today we are focusing on Scotland. Whether or not you are applying to a Scottish university or college, you may want to consider your options while reading the article. Yes, there are also challenges to studying in Scotland, but this is the recurring theme everywhere. The overall benefits you will reap here are incredible, and they won’t just come from your placement at a good university.

Here are 5 reasons to study in Scotland!

  1. Its universities have a historic reputation
    The story speaks for itself: Scottish universities have been around for a long time now and are among the most renowned in the world. As a historic center of education, Scotland has offered academic excellence and wonderful career opportunities to those who deserve it. It has a number of world renowned educational institutions with the University of Edinburgh, the University of Glasgow and the University of St. Andrews being among the top ranked in the world. There are other universities which are very good and which have helped to strengthen the country’s place among the world leaders in education. One caveat though, studying at one of its universities will be a costly affair, so try to secure a scholarship to handle the financial burden.
  2. Usually expensive, but cheapest in the country
    It’s weird when I say Scottish universities are also the cheapest in the country. In general, they are very expensive. However, if you compare them to those in other parts of the country, especially England, then they are relatively cheaper. Moreover, when it comes to other areas of spending such as food and accommodation, they are also relatively inexpensive. In fact, a number of its cities are some of the cheapest like Glasgow. So if you want to pursue exemplary and cheaper higher education and that too in UK then prefer Scotland.
  3. Culturally beautiful
    It is not just quality education that improves an individual. There are so many external factors that condition us to better beings, and that includes the local culture. Countries with a closed, conservative culture and an uncompromising approach to foreigners often fail to impress their resident students. On the contrary, those with a welcoming and party culture provide mental support to their overseas student body – and Scotland is pretty much that. It is home to rich cultural experiences, from Highland games to famous kilts; there is anything that can put you in a good mood. So, it is not just your curriculum that you will learn from. The world around you will teach you new things.
  4. High search yield
    This is especially necessary for those who wish to pursue postgraduate or doctoral studies in the country. Unless there is a well-designed research program and facilities, there is no point in taking such courses. Scotland, however, has a very thriving research-driven culture; in fact, most of its universities have been designated as high yield research and citation institutions. Faculties from all programs have published articles in reputable journals, have international exposure, and command respect in academia. If you undertake such programs here, you will necessarily be included in research projects, so it is not just theoretical research that you signed up for.
  5. Brilliant career opportunities
    Scotland has room for everyone as long as you have the right kind of knowledge and skills. It has a low unemployment rate and offers internships to deserving people in many distinguished organizations. Whatever your professional background, you will surely find your place. For example, the country’s National Health Service offers the greatest employment opportunities to people in more than 50 different occupations. Likewise, there are many possibilities in the arts, humanities and sciences.

Follow the latest news live on CEOWORLD magazine and get updates from the US and around the world. The opinions expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of CEOWORLD magazine. Follow CEOWORLD magazine on Twitter and Facebook. For media inquiries, please contact: info@ceoworld.biz



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