England education – CV New Eng http://cvneweng.org/ Wed, 18 May 2022 13:15:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://cvneweng.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-52-120x120.png England education – CV New Eng http://cvneweng.org/ 32 32 ESFA Update continuing education: May 18, 2022 https://cvneweng.org/esfa-update-continuing-education-may-18-2022/ Wed, 18 May 2022 13:15:33 +0000 https://cvneweng.org/esfa-update-continuing-education-may-18-2022/ 1. Action: Apply for a grant to train a senior mental health officer This financial year, a further two-thirds of all eligible institutions in England will have the opportunity to benefit from quality training for mental health managers, supported by an additional £7 million in training grants. We have published guidance on how to access […]]]>

1. Action: Apply for a grant to train a senior mental health officer

This financial year, a further two-thirds of all eligible institutions in England will have the opportunity to benefit from quality training for mental health managers, supported by an additional £7 million in training grants.

We have published guidance on how to access and apply for your grant.

For more information about the grant, read the Senior Mental Health Training Manager guidelines.

2. Action: review of post-16 qualifications at level 3 and below in England

We have published a tentative list of qualifications for which funding approval will be removed for 16-19 year olds from 1 August 2024 and the process for certifying bodies (CBs) to appeal the decision to remove funding.

In the second stage consultation of post-16 qualifications exam at level 3 and belowthe Department for Education has announced plans to remove funding approval for 16-19 year olds from qualifications which overlap with T-levels. Indeed, we believe the rigor of T-levels means they offer the best overall preparation for students to enter skilled employment, and are therefore the right choice for most 16-19 year olds wishing to follow a technical route.

We have also published guidelines on appeals, which explain how awarding organizations can submit an appeal to us to explain why funding approval should be retained for individual qualifications. Appeals will only be accepted by awarding organizations and must be submitted by 5 p.m. on Friday July 8, 2022.

Contracting organizations can access additional support by attending a webinar on the appeals process on Thursday, May 26 from 2-4 p.m. You can submit all your questions and register your interest in the webinar.

3. Reminder: Coronavirus (COVID-19) 16 to 19 Tuition Claim Form 2022 to 2023

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Tuition Fund Form 16 to 19 2022 to 2023 is online.

The deadline for submission is Friday, May 27, 2022 at 11:59 p.m.

We have published tips to help you access and complete the form.

You can learn more in the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Tuition Fund Guidelines 16 to 19 2022 to 2023.

4. Reminder: expected year-end funding request for 2021 to 2022

The year-end provisional funding request window will open at 9:00 a.m. on Friday, June 10, 2022. Please submit your year-end funding request by 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday, June 15, 2022. The application form will be available at Submit learner data.
You will need to submit a claim if you receive funds through these contracts:

  • Grant Funded – ESFA Adult Education Budget (AEB) (Adult Skills, Community Learning, Internships 19-24 and NSF Level 3 Adult Offer (for learners aged 23 or less))
  • Grant Funded – ESFA NSF Level 3 Adult Offer (for learners aged 24 or over)
  • funded grant – Advanced Learner Loan Bursary (ALLB)
  • 16 to 19 education

For more information, please see the 2021-2022 Funding Application Guidelines. A user guide helps you complete the form.

Once you have submitted your complaint, you will also be able to view it on the Manage your education and skills funding.

If you have any questions, please Contact us.

5. Reminder: update of the course directory with the apprenticeship training offer

Under the Learning agreementMajor apprenticeship training providers are required to provide up-to-date information, via Publish to the Course Directory, on the apprenticeships they offer that are funded by ESFA.

Course directory data and information is shared with employers when they use ESFA’s Find Apprenticeship Training online search function, to find apprenticeship standards and identify approved providers who can deliver training.

Find Apprenticeship Training provides information to employers about a training provider’s organization and their apprenticeship offering, including the geographies they cover, helping to inform employer choice. It is important that this information is up to date so that employers and ESFA have an accurate view of the coverage of apprenticeship provision for all apprenticeships.

To ensure compliance with your apprenticeship contract, we ask all service providers to ensure that their information is up-to-date and complete. You can add new learnings, edit and update existing learnings, and remove those that you no longer offer via Publish to Course Directory.

You may also find it useful to read the guidance on submitting your apprenticeship training offer via Publish to Course Directory.

6. Reminder: The Coronavirus (COVID-19) Workforce Fund Application Form is Open

Eligible schools and colleges can now submit a claim for the cost of absences incurred between Monday, November 22, 2021 and Friday, April 8, 2022.

We have published advice on how to complete the complaint form.

The deadline to submit a claim is Tuesday, May 24, 2022 at 11:59 p.m.

More information on the COVID-19 workforce fund can be found in our guidance for schools and colleges.

We have released an updated College Financial Benchmarking Tool with data from higher education and 2020-2021 sixth-grade college financial records, submitted to ESFA by May 10, 2021. tool allows colleges to compare their performance with others in the sector.

We have also released the college accounts dataset for 2020 to 2021 based on financial records.

8. Information: Removed role from Manage Your Education Funding and Skills service

The vendor support user role in Manage Your Education & Skills Funding is redundant and we will be removing it shortly. If you only have this role, you will no longer be able to log in. There are no changes for the other roles.

If you have any questions, please contact the Help Center.

9. Information: latest update on EQA reform progress

Considerable progress has been made with the transition from quality assurance reforms to learning assessment with external quality assurance (EQA) of over 270 apprenticeships covering around 95% of apprentices transitioning to Ofqual.

By the end of May, a total of 272 apprenticeships previously overseen by the former Institute for Apprenticeship and Technical Education (IfATE) EQA service will have moved to Ofqual, covering over 95% of apprentices.

This means Ofqual will provide an EQA for at least 470 apprenticeships in total – taking into account those it already regulates.

IfATE will provide a temporary, free, in-house consulting and quality assurance solution for around 40 apprenticeships that will not be transferred by the end of May. This will ensure that final evaluation (EPA) can continue and that quality will be maintained. For any enquiries, advice or requests for further information regarding the temporary service, please contact IfATE.

The second phase of the transition process covers Final Assessment Organizations (EPAOs) whose EQA provider service was previously provided by a professional body. Their first applications must be submitted by May 16, 2022, and it is expected that the transfer process will be concluded by December 31, 2022, in accordance with the program published in October 2021.

EPAOs already recognized by Ofqual, who wish to expand their scope to include other standards, should continue to submit them as soon as possible and there is no limit to the number of times an EPAO can request the recognition.

ten. Information: Adult Education Budget (AEB) funding rules updated 2021 to 2022: National Skills Fund Tier 3 offer for learners aged 19-23

The performance management section of the funding rules clarifies the use of LDM code 378, to record the delivery of learners aged 19-23 for all National Skills Fund Tier 3 offerings when submitting ILR data.

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Jurist job at BPP EDUCATION GROUP https://cvneweng.org/jurist-job-at-bpp-education-group/ Mon, 16 May 2022 19:29:41 +0000 https://cvneweng.org/jurist-job-at-bpp-education-group/ Applicants must provide proof of their right to work in the UK as BPP are unable to provide visa sponsorship Job Profile Legal – Legal Advisor Type of Contract Permanent Purpose of the position Provide legal advisory services to BPP Professional Training Group The objective of this role is to help provide legal advisory services […]]]>

Applicants must provide proof of their right to work in the UK as BPP are unable to provide visa sponsorship

Job Profile Legal – Legal Advisor

Type of Contract Permanent

Purpose of the position

Provide legal advisory services to BPP Professional Training Group

The objective of this role is to help provide legal advisory services to the entire BPP Professional Education Group (UK and International), in particular in relation to the following key areas: commercial contracts, corporate structuring and governance, regulatory compliance, consumer law, intellectual property, data protection and marketing. As an integral member of the legal team, this role is created for individuals with a dedication and passion for legal work with a larger goal in mind.

what you gonna do

  • Manage new assignments from the legal inbox (covering a wide range of topics)
  • Provide appropriate legal advice to the business within the team’s SLAs.
  • Provide legal advisory services, including in the following key areas: commercial contracts (with a focus on apprenticeship contracts and IT contracts), corporate structuring and governance, regulatory compliance, consumer law, intellectual property, data protection and marketing.

Assist in supervising junior team members.

The role is a hybrid role, with the successful candidate required to travel to BPP offices (London Liverpool Street and from June 2022 London Portsoken Street) two days a week, and any additional days reasonably required.

Choose a better work-life balance

With hybrid work available, you will be able to split your time between one of our centers and wherever you choose to call home. Either way, you’ll benefit from a vibrant workplace and a culture that believes in the importance of caring for others, while being part of a diverse workforce where difference is celebrated. Plus, you’ll work alongside other like-minded professionals who champion progress, while having opportunities for development in an environment where creativity and innovation are rewarded. In addition to a competitive salary, we offer a generous 25 days of annual leave, and there’s a rewards package that includes retail discounts, a personal group pension plan, dedicated healthcare and dental plans. that provide additional insurance to take care of you and your family. . Brilliantly, you can also study any of the BPP courses for free, whether it is a professional qualification or a full degree.

Main responsibilities:

Please refer to the attached job description.

department Legal

vacation spot United Kingdom, London, London Liverpool Street

Application criteria

What we are looking for

  • Be a qualified solicitor in England and Wales (we are looking for a 2-year PQE NQ Solicitor, although applications from any PQE will be considered).
  • Demonstrable experience in advising on commercial contracts.
  • Experience with data protection law (especially DPA 2018).
  • Comfortable answering a wide range of questions on a variety of business, client and student topics via our legal inbox.
  • Possess exceptional writing, negotiation, problem solving, team, communication and client management skills.
  • Possess strong interpersonal skills with the ability to communicate complex legal concepts in a clear and understandable format both orally and in writing to a multidisciplinary team.
  • Ability to manage own workload and clients.
  • Demonstrate a keen interest in working internally.
  • Experience in the field of compliance, tenders, consumer law or intellectual property law will be an added advantage.
  • Experience in labor law or civil litigation would be a plus.
  • A first internal experience would be a plus.
  • Interest in the education sector, and the regulations governing higher education in particular. Although educational experience is beneficial, it is not essential.

Does this seem like the ideal solution to you? Apply today.

Job details

Contract hours 37.50

AND P 1.00

Salary 55K to 60K depending on experience

Attachments

Full job description

JD Legal Advisor – 2022.pdf (62 KB)

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Tanzanian Ministries of Education, Schools2030 and UNICEF’s Data Must Speak Research join forces to improve education in the country – United Republic of Tanzania https://cvneweng.org/tanzanian-ministries-of-education-schools2030-and-unicefs-data-must-speak-research-join-forces-to-improve-education-in-the-country-united-republic-of-tanzania/ Fri, 13 May 2022 00:37:12 +0000 https://cvneweng.org/tanzanian-ministries-of-education-schools2030-and-unicefs-data-must-speak-research-join-forces-to-improve-education-in-the-country-united-republic-of-tanzania/ 12 May 22, Florence/London – UNICEF Data Should Speak Positively Deviance Research* extends to Tanzania. The research, which is now active in 14 countries, aims to improve education around the world by identifying best practices from successful schools. Data Must Speak (DMS) research identifies these “positive deviant” schools and explores why they perform better than […]]]>

12 May 22, Florence/London – UNICEF Data Should Speak Positively Deviance Research* extends to Tanzania. The research, which is now active in 14 countries, aims to improve education around the world by identifying best practices from successful schools.

Data Must Speak (DMS) research identifies these “positive deviant” schools and explores why they perform better than others despite operating under similar conditions. Using a mixed-methods approach, positive deviant schools will be analyzed to identify exceptional behaviors and practices. By working hand-in-hand with Tanzania’s Ministries of Education (MoEVT and MoEST) and local partners, promising innovations in basic education can then be scaled up to improve every child’s learning. .

Some Tanzanian schools involved in DMS research will also participate in the Schools2030 project – a global initiative led by the Aga Khan Foundation that aims to catalyze school-based holistic learning innovations to improve the quality of teaching and learning in ten countries and 1000 schools. By identifying positive trends at the school level and the factors that contribute to some schools performing better than others, DMS research will gather evidence that, in the long run, will help efforts to scale up positive trends. to impact education systems and learners around the world.

The data collected through this research, which is funded by the Jacobs Foundation as part of the research component of Schools2030, will then be used to produce accessible and actionable recommendations on how to adapt these local solutions to ensure that children’s learning outcomes can be improved nationally and across the entire global learning community. Specifically, the results of this research will support the mission of Tanzania’s Ministries of Education to strengthen the country’s public education systems. Key insights are expected to feed into Tanzania’s ongoing education development plan, and findings from future stages of the research will continue to feed into government education sector planning.

“Schools2030 and Data Must Speak share the fundamental belief that teachers are the most important agents of change in education systems. This research partnership will allow us to identify and amplify examples of “what works” by teachers for teachers, to improve learning outcomes and equity,” said Dr Bronwen Magrath, Schools2030 Global Program Manager.

“Partnerships are essential in our goal to inform systems change and drive action toward greater student success. This new partnership is extremely well received, and we look forward to exploring the insights that high-performing Tanzanian schools can bring to our global research,” mentioned Renaud CombaData Must Speak Research Manager at UNICEF Office of Research – Innocenti.

Preliminary results on the contextual factors that contribute to academic performance will be published by mid-2023 on the DMS Search Webpage.

The research will be part of broader discussions on how best to promote cooperation and dialogue across schools, systems and societies to improve holistic learning outcomes that will take place during the first Schools2030 Global Forum in June 2022 in Dar es Salaam.

Notes to Editorrs
* Positive deviance research involves identifying individuals or organizations that perform better than their peers, despite facing similar constraints or challenges.
* DMS research is currently ongoing in Brazil, Burkina Faso, Chad, Ivory Coast, Ethiopia, Ghana, Lao PDR, Madagascar, Mali, Nepal, Niger, Tanzania, Togo and Zambia.

About the UNICEF Office of Research – Innocenti
The Office of Research – Innocenti is the dedicated research center of UNICEF. It undertakes research on emerging or current issues to inform the strategic directions, policies and programs of UNICEF and its partners, shape global debates on children’s rights and development, and inform the global development agenda. research and policy for all children, especially the most vulnerable. . To visit www.unicef-irc.org and follow UNICEF Innocenti on Twitter, Facebook, instagram and LinkedIn.

About UNICEF UK
UNICEF works in some of the world’s toughest places, to reach the world’s most disadvantaged children. In 190 countries and territories, we work for every child, everywhere, to build a better world for everyone. The United Kingdom Committee for UNICEF (UNICEF UK) raises funds for UNICEF’s emergency and development work for children. We also promote and protect children’s rights in the UK and around the world. We are a UK charity, fully funded by supporters. United Kingdom Committee for UNICEF (UNICEF UK), Registered Charity No. 1072612 (England & Wales), SC043677 (Scotland). For more information visit unicef.org.uk.

About Schools2030
Schools2030 is a ten-year participatory learning improvement program based in 1,000 public schools in ten countries. Schools2030 helps teachers and students design and implement educational micro-innovations. These low-cost, scalable innovations will inform and transform education systems to improve holistic learning outcomes for the most marginalized learners around the world. Join the movement on Twitter, Facebookand LinkedIn.

About the Aga Khan Foundation
Established in 1967, the Aga Khan Foundation (AKF) brings together human, financial and technical resources to address the challenges facing the world’s poorest and most marginalized communities. Particular emphasis is placed on investing in human potential, expanding opportunities and improving the overall quality of life. The Aga Khan Foundation is an agency of the Aga Khan Development Network.

For more information, please contact:

UNICEF Office of Research – Innocenti
Kathleen Sullivan, Chief Communications Officer, ai
kcsullivan@unicef.org
Such. +39 05 52 03 32 22

Schools2030
Sarah James, Global Communications Manager
Sarah.james@akdn.org
Such. +44 207 387 3862; +44 738 489 2599

UNICEF United Kingdom
Chloe Cole, Media and Communications Manager, Partnerships
colec@unicef.org.uk
Such. +44 77 33 005 338

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The upgrading program means nothing without improving education https://cvneweng.org/the-upgrading-program-means-nothing-without-improving-education/ Wed, 11 May 2022 12:07:00 +0000 https://cvneweng.org/the-upgrading-program-means-nothing-without-improving-education/ Britain is still a country where privilege matters: where you start in life is all too likely to be where you end. We still have an absurd apartheid in education. Private education was once a realistic option for middle-class parents, but rampant inflation has made it an elite sport. This defines our inability to “level” […]]]>

Britain is still a country where privilege matters: where you start in life is all too likely to be where you end. We still have an absurd apartheid in education. Private education was once a realistic option for middle-class parents, but rampant inflation has made it an elite sport. This defines our inability to “level” the country for decades.

The truth is that, despite all the election slogans, reforming schools well will make or break the Prime Minister’s agenda for England left behind. You cannot bring prosperity to these regions without first encouraging excellence in education.

The new Schools and Universities legislation, announced in yesterday’s Queen’s Speech, would ideally be a chance to do so. Ministers will soon present plans to shake up school funding and expand the reach of the administrative bodies that oversee most UK academies. Yet we risk seeing these new-style multi-academy trusts replicate the old local education authorities they replaced.

This was never the intention of Coalition-era education reforms that saw new schools emerge, challenging state monopoly.

The prime minister says he wants to expand opportunities, so why not start by breaking up the private school cartel? It is not just a chimera; education reformers begin to create new low-cost private schools. Visionary educator James Tooley, for example, did this with his Independent Grammar School in Durham, which charges a fraction of the fees of nearby independents. A few more and the whole private school deck of cards will crumble.

It’s not just the affluent middle classes who would benefit either, as the increased choice works in everyone’s favour. As parents vote on their feet, schools around the world will have to up their game or go bust.

Ministers should also use the unused capacity of our most prestigious private schools. Last year, there were more than 9,000 places available in prestigious boarding schools. Ministers should be compelled to buy those places at a discount and give them to bright kids growing up in foster homes. Many will be refugees, what a story that would make.

Elsewhere, we need to properly address our deepest social mobility issues. This week, think tank Civitas discovered that only 50 children who grew up in institutions went to our top 50 universities in 2020: a dismal record that means you’re more likely to meet an Ecuadorian undergraduate than a child who was raised in an institution at a leading university. Low expectations for children in care are institutionally anchored within the Ministry of Education. We don’t even bother to measure the level of education of this group beyond 16 years of age.

We are waiting to see what the promised educational reforms will bring. We are told that there will be actions on school attendance, illegal schools and the suppression of diplomas with little return on investment. These are all interesting questions to occupy the time of legislators.

But in the end, it will be a simple question that defines success or failure: does a disadvantaged child in the poorest parts of the country have more or less chance of achieving educational excellence at the end of this Parliament than it was at the beginning? Only sweeping school reform, relentlessly focused on standards, will give our stagnant rates of social mobility the boost they need.


Frank Young is editorial director of the think tank Civitas

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Queen’s Speech should include crackdown on unregulated schools | Education Policy https://cvneweng.org/queens-speech-should-include-crackdown-on-unregulated-schools-education-policy/ Fri, 06 May 2022 19:06:00 +0000 https://cvneweng.org/queens-speech-should-include-crackdown-on-unregulated-schools-education-policy/ A planned crackdown on unsafe or unregulated independent schools is expected to be included in next week’s Queen’s Speech, including the threat of jail time and unlimited fines for owners who ignore safeguard concerns. The Department for Education (DfE) has said it is ready to submit legislation to give the government and Ofsted broader powers […]]]>

A planned crackdown on unsafe or unregulated independent schools is expected to be included in next week’s Queen’s Speech, including the threat of jail time and unlimited fines for owners who ignore safeguard concerns.

The Department for Education (DfE) has said it is ready to submit legislation to give the government and Ofsted broader powers to investigate and close private schools in England, with plans to broaden its definition of a school to force more parameters to officially register.

Under those powers, the education secretary could suspend an independent school’s registration if there were “serious safeguarding failings that pose a risk of harm to pupils”.

The suspension could then be enforced through a new criminal offense that could make an owner liable if their school remains open after the suspension.

Diana Barran, the Lords Schools Minister, said: “For too long some children have been able to squeeze through the loopholes of the system, spending most or all of their time during the day in environments that do not meet the required standards of safeguard or quality of teaching. »

Ofsted would also gain new powers to investigate illegal schools and support criminal proceedings against unregistered full-time schools.

Amanda Spielman, Ofsted’s chief inspector, said she “highly appreciates” the proposals, which she has supported for several years.

“Thousands of children are currently being educated in unsuitable and unsafe illegal schools, which puts their well-being at risk and deprives them of a proper education,” Spielman said. “I look forward to seeing more details of how our powers to investigate illegal schools will be strengthened, and I hope to see this legislation featured in the Queen’s Speech next week.”

Sign up for First Edition, our free daily newsletter – every weekday morning at 7am BST

The new DfE definition means that a facility will need to register as a school if it educates school-aged children for 18 hours or more per week and operates for at least part of that time during school hours. of class.

The change fills a loophole that meant institutions were only required to register as schools if they taught 18 hours a week entirely during school hours.

The DfE said: “Although some faith groups, such as people of the Charedi Jewish faith, may be disproportionately affected by the proposals, the benefits they bring to the quality of children’s education and supervision of protection through regulated activity are of greater importance. ”

Current laws in England allow many establishments to avoid registration as schools, while others that operate as illegal schools have been able to escape punishment and remain open.

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Five schools in South Wiltshire are part of Acorn Education Trust https://cvneweng.org/five-schools-in-south-wiltshire-are-part-of-acorn-education-trust/ Tue, 03 May 2022 15:24:53 +0000 https://cvneweng.org/five-schools-in-south-wiltshire-are-part-of-acorn-education-trust/ Five schools in South Wiltshire are today (May 1) part of the Acorn Education Trust. Avon Valley Academy, Bulford St Leonard’s Primary School, Durrington All Saints Church of England Infant School, Netheravon All Saints Church of England Primary School and St Michael’s Church of England Primary School were formerly part of Salisbury Plain Academies Trust. […]]]>

Five schools in South Wiltshire are today (May 1) part of the Acorn Education Trust.

Avon Valley Academy, Bulford St Leonard’s Primary School, Durrington All Saints Church of England Infant School, Netheravon All Saints Church of England Primary School and St Michael’s Church of England Primary School were formerly part of Salisbury Plain Academies Trust.

Sara Edwards, CEO of Acorn Education Trust, said: “I am delighted that we have added five schools to our Acorn family and are offering a warm welcome to their staff, as well as parents/guardians and especially children.

“All schools within Acorn Education Trust have their own identity, traditions and strengths, which helps to further our vision of ‘preparing young people for their world in their time’.

Formed in 2014, Acorn Education Trust now has 19 institutions in Wiltshire.

Acorn Education Trust’s Head of External Relations and Governance, Max Burr, added: “By joining Acorn Education Trust, all five schools, along with our existing settings, will benefit from enhanced collaboration and financial security. reinforced.

“This in turn will help ensure the sustainability of each Acorn Education Trust environment and ensure a strong and prosperous future for all.”

Over the past few weeks, Acorn Education Trust staff have worked alongside staff from all five schools to make the transition as smooth as possible, develop school improvement programs and share resources.

Rob Price, Principal of Secondary Schools, added: “It has been amazing working alongside the existing team at each of the schools over the past few months and forging strong working relationships. We look forward to building on these early foundations, helping schools’ ambitions become reality and seeing children flourish.

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UK education secretary urges remaining schools to take part in national tutoring scheme https://cvneweng.org/uk-education-secretary-urges-remaining-schools-to-take-part-in-national-tutoring-scheme/ Mon, 02 May 2022 01:18:21 +0000 https://cvneweng.org/uk-education-secretary-urges-remaining-schools-to-take-part-in-national-tutoring-scheme/ Parents in England will have access to data revealing how their school is using the National Tutoring Scheme, the Education Secretary announced today (2 May 2022). The program is at the heart of the Education Secretary’s commitment to parents, ensuring that any child who falls behind in English and maths will receive personalized support to […]]]>

Parents in England will have access to data revealing how their school is using the National Tutoring Scheme, the Education Secretary announced today (2 May 2022).

The program is at the heart of the Education Secretary’s commitment to parents, ensuring that any child who falls behind in English and maths will receive personalized support to help them get back on track, and the parents will be kept informed of their progress. This will support the government’s mission to upgrade education to ensure that 90% of primary school children reach the expected level in reading, writing and mathematics by 2030.

The national tutoring program is part of the government’s ambitious Covid recovery plan, providing government-funded high-quality remedial tutoring, world-class training for teachers and early years practitioners, additional funding for schools and an extension of time in colleges by 40 hours a year, backed by an additional investment of £5 billion.

In a letter to all schools, sent today, the Education Secretary confirmed plans to publish data on each school’s involvement this autumn, helping parents understand how their school is taking up the offer of government-funded support to help students catch up on lost learning. The data will also be shared with Ofsted, with the department working with Ofsted over the coming months on the best use of this data.

Since the tutoring program launched in November 2020, approximately 1.2 million high-quality tutoring lessons have been initiated by students, including just under 900,000 this school year. The department estimates that 40% of schools have yet to offer tutoring sessions under the national tutoring program this school year.

In the letter, Secretary of State Nadhim Zahawi will write:

I now appeal, especially to schools that have not yet started offering tutoring, to ensure that you do so as soon as possible this term – don’t miss an opportunity to help students who may benefit now.

Starting this week, my department will contact schools that have not yet offered tutoring support to discuss their plans and offer additional support to ensure they can offer tutoring to their students this term.

As part of my desire to ensure greater transparency on the impact of the program, I plan to publish at the end of the year the data on the tutoring offer of each school as well as the funding allocations and the number of students eligible for the student bonus. I will also share this information with Ofsted.

The education secretary’s letter encourages the few remaining schools that have yet to use the national tutoring scheme to do so, as the school year draws to a close. Schools that have not yet offered lessons under the scheme will be contacted individually starting this week to discuss their plans and offer support.

The department intends to release data in the fall on the provision of tutoring in schools in the 21/22 school year, in addition to the data the government already publishes on national participation, as well as on school-level funding allocations. More details will be available in due course.

Evidence suggests that small group lessons can speed up progress by an average of two months in secondary schools and four months in primary schools.

Current funding for the National Tutoring Scheme is sufficient to provide a lesson for every pupil eligible for the Pupil Bonus, helping to fulfill parents’ commitment to help all children in need.

Primary students have already recovered about two-thirds of the progress lost due to the pandemic in reading and about half of the progress lost in math, demonstrating the effectiveness of the broader and ambitious education recovery program of the government.

In March, the department announced updates to simplify the scheme, including the decision to provide the full £349m of tutoring funding for AY22/23 directly to schools. The decision was made following feedback from schools and stakeholders, giving schools the freedom to decide how best to provide tutoring to their children.

The recovery plan, with tutoring at its heart, supports the government’s mission to upgrade education to ensure that 90% of primary school children reach the expected level in key stage 2 reading, writing and mathematics by 2030 – and for the national average GCSE score in English and Maths to drop from 4.5 to 5, by the same time.

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Election promises of the conservative Torfaen group for the local elections https://cvneweng.org/election-promises-of-the-conservative-torfaen-group-for-the-local-elections/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 14:31:24 +0000 https://cvneweng.org/election-promises-of-the-conservative-torfaen-group-for-the-local-elections/ THE Torfaen Conservative group said it would spend more money fixing potholes and prioritizing education and social services ahead of next week’s election. Four Conservative councilors were elected to Torfaen council in 2017, and the group hopes to maintain that number. There are 21 candidates running for the party, one less than in the last […]]]>

THE Torfaen Conservative group said it would spend more money fixing potholes and prioritizing education and social services ahead of next week’s election.

Four Conservative councilors were elected to Torfaen council in 2017, and the group hopes to maintain that number. There are 21 candidates running for the party, one less than in the last local elections in 2017.

Huw Bevan, leader of the Conservative Torfaen group, said they were campaigning on a range of issues in the borough. Mr Bevan says more money needs to be spent on road maintenance, saying the current ‘patch and fix’ policy for potholes is not working.

“There’s a backlog of £30m in essential maintenance and it’s just not being addressed,” he said.

“They’ve put £1m aside but it’s not enough.”

The group is calling for more investment in infrastructure and capital projects, saying spending in this area has seen a “steady decline”.

Mr Bevan also said the Tory group would have frozen council tax this year due to the cost of living crisis.

“We feel like it’s gone up so many times over the last 10 years,” he said.

“In previous years, it exceeded the rate of inflation.”

He said the group could not freeze the rate for the council’s five-year term, but would have done so this year due to the pressures residents are facing due to inflation.

Questions about the number of children in care in the borough and the steps being taken to safely reduce this number were also raised by the group.

The rate of children ‘in care’ in Torfaen, per 10,000 children, is the highest in England and Wales, according to government figures.

“It’s a big concern,” he said.

“Why do we have so many children in care? Why are we the highest in Wales?

“What more could we do around early intervention? Is there some sort of systemic problem in the borough?

“I don’t know. I asked questions but I don’t have an answer as to why the number of children is so high in Torfaen.

The group is also campaigning for ‘a greener agenda’, saying that although Labor says it is one of their priorities, they have not done enough while controlling the council.

Improving education standards is also on the group’s agenda, and supporting schools emerging from special measures.

Questions about the council’s request for increased funding have also been raised, with the Tories saying it will not create jobs and could be used more effectively to help town centres.

Mr Bevan says ‘a small number of people’ have said they will not vote for the group due to party controversy in Downing Street, but he is ‘reasonably confident’ of retaining all four council seats .

He added: “A few people have messaged us to say thank you for our support and the work we’ve done in the past and that they weren’t going to vote Conservative this time because of partygate, but that’s what happened. is a small number who have contacted us about this.

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SEND request pushes council’s education deficit to £22.5m https://cvneweng.org/send-request-pushes-councils-education-deficit-to-22-5m/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 16:46:43 +0000 https://cvneweng.org/send-request-pushes-councils-education-deficit-to-22-5m/ A report published today by the Bureau of Investigative Journalism has uncovered a £1.3billion ‘financial black hole’ at the center of the special needs education and disability system – and it is growing rapidly” Education crisis: The SEND families have been fighting for their rights for several years Croydon council’s DSG deficit – the Dedicated […]]]>

A report published today by the Bureau of Investigative Journalism has uncovered a £1.3billion ‘financial black hole’ at the center of the special needs education and disability system – and it is growing rapidly”

Education crisis: The SEND families have been fighting for their rights for several years

Croydon council’s DSG deficit – the Dedicated Schools Grant – has risen by more than a fifth in the last financial year as covid pressures and growing demand for special education services have seen the Borough schools spend an extra £4m that they don’t have.

Croydon’s DSG was in deficit by £22.52million at the end of the 2021-22 financial year, according to figures obtained by the Bureau of Investigative Journalism for a special report on the growing crisis around education needs funding and Disabilities – SEND.

For cash-strapped Croydon, this growing shortfall in its education budget presents a significant strain on its finances, as the town hall plans to cut £38.4m from overall spending this financial year. With Whitehall-imposed commissioners watching every move, even after already cutting many non-statutory services, Croydon is set to cut a further £30million from its overall spending in 2023-24.

And although Croydon’s DSG deficit is far from the worst – Tory-controlled counties Surrey (£118m, up from over £50m last year) and Kent (103m pounds) top this particular table – that’s still enough to warrant the council submitting a recovery plan to the DfE.

Inside Croydon reported earlier this week how neighboring Merton needed a £28.8m bailout from the DfE due to spiraling education budget deficits which official reports said were presenting ‘a significant impact on the council’s resources and potentially on the authority’s financial resilience”.

Coded: few councils seem to follow their statutory guidelines. Fewer still seem to be able to afford

Croydon council’s overall finances, in case anyone needs a reminder, went bankrupt in November 2020 and last year the borough received what was then a government record bailout of 120 million of pounds sterling. So returning to Whitehall so soon due to issues within its education department might not be welcomed.

Yet as the Bureau of Investigative Journalism report foundIn that regard, at least, the SEND funding crisis is hitting local communities across the country.

Today’s report says: “As the government launches a consultation on the future of the SEND offer, a Bureau investigation revealed the human consequences of a desperately underfunded system. With a huge deficit in local authorities in England continuing to grow, the result is an increasingly adversarial process in which parents, schools and local authorities are pitted against each other, the needs of a child appearing secondary in relation to the financial costs.

It is this ‘conflict’ situation with which the SEND families of Croydon, Sutton and Surrey are all too familiar.

Like Inside Croydon reported as early as 2017, the council was spending up to a third of its SEND budget on legal fees for Education Tribunal cases, typically when the authority sought to avoid having to bear the full costs of children and children. Young Adults’ EHCP – Education, Health and Care Plans, which are supposed to be agreed upon and outline how the state will provide for the needs of young people, sometimes up to the age of 25.

The Bureau report today indicates that there is a financial black hole at the center of the SEND system and that it is growing rapidly.

“The Bureau’s investigation found the special needs deficit across England has reached at least £1.3billion, an increase of around £450million in the last year alone.

For some local authorities, the growing indebtedness is unsustainable.

Councils blame growing demand and growing complexity of needs, problems exacerbated by the covid-19 pandemic and pressures they are struggling to cope with due to a shortage of local government funded SEND services. This has led some – like Merton – to become dependent on private schools, never the cheapest option. Some families are forced to seek suitable placements further from home, driving children away from their local communities and leaving them with long commutes to and from school.

Across the country, at least 43,000 children are placed in schools or other educational institutions outside their home local authority, the Bureau reports.

Of these, 3,300 are educated more than 20 miles away. The Bureau has found one case where a child is being educated more than 400 miles from home – the distance from his family in Cornwall to Newcastle at the other end of England.

Stephen Kingdom, spokesman for the Disabled Children’s Partnership, a coalition of 100 charities for children and people with disabilities, said the Bureau’s investigation revealed “worrying data about the distances children with disabilities travel just to go to school. ‘school”.

In the face of government pressure to cut costs, some councils are considering imposing thresholds or introducing other changes that could make it more difficult for children to access support, or are threatening to withdraw or reduce what they have already. Some boards reject nearly half of all requests for children to be assessed to determine if they need the additional support provided with an EHCP.

Main conclusions

  • England’s special needs funding black hole has hit £1.3bn – an increase of £465m (52%) in a single year
  • 3 out of 4 local authorities have SEND funding gaps, some of which have doubled or even tripled in the last 12 months
  • Some councils are trying to cut costs by introducing measures that could make it harder for children to receive support, or reduce or remove help from those who already have it
  • Kent County Council’s deficit is £103m – the biggest in terms of cash of any local authority in England
  • Some parts of the country do not have the capacity or specialist facilities attached to mainstream schools to cope with growing demand, leaving some councils dependent on more expensive independent frameworks
  • Lack of local support and the growing complexity of needs means that some 43,000 SEND children in England are placed in schools outside their home region, including 3,300 in settings around 20 miles or more from where they live. of residence.

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About insidecroydon

News, views and analysis about the people of Croydon, their lives and their political times in London’s diverse and most populous borough. Based in Croydon and edited by Steven Downes. To contact us, please email inside.croydon@btinternet.com

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Overhauling Higher Technical Education (HTE) could be key to government plans to revolutionize UK skills, says new report – FE News https://cvneweng.org/overhauling-higher-technical-education-hte-could-be-key-to-government-plans-to-revolutionize-uk-skills-says-new-report-fe-news/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 23:01:13 +0000 https://cvneweng.org/overhauling-higher-technical-education-hte-could-be-key-to-government-plans-to-revolutionize-uk-skills-says-new-report-fe-news/ A new report from the Lifelong Education Commission argues that reversing the decline in higher technical education (HTE) provision in England could be key to delivering the government’s upgrading plans. This finding follows detailed research by the LEC, supported by the University of Salford, which found that higher technical education in the UK is in […]]]>

A new report from the Lifelong Education Commission argues that reversing the decline in higher technical education (HTE) provision in England could be key to delivering the government’s upgrading plans. This finding follows detailed research by the LEC, supported by the University of Salford, which found that higher technical education in the UK is in rapid decline. Over the past 5 years, learner enrollment in HTE courses has dropped by 25%, while completion of full degrees has increased by 8% over the same period.

LEC President and former Universities Minister Chris Skidmore explains the problem:

“Higher technical education has too often been treated as the neglected stage of the education sector, despite having a rich and proud tradition to sustain it. The decline of specialist technical colleges in the 1990s led to an explosion in higher education, but it also left huge swaths of English learners without the skills they need to adapt to a rapidly changing economy. . That’s why boosting higher technical education should be priority number one in the government’s plan to launch a ‘skills revolution’ in the UK. The legislative framework in this regard has already been established in the Post-16 Skills and Education Bill. However, to make the most of this golden opportunity, policy makers must choose the right approach”

The report comes at a time when the value of superior technical skills is increasingly recognized in Westminster.

In its White Paper on Upgrading and the Post-16 Skills and Education Bill, the government announced a series of initiatives to increase the quantity and quality of FTE provision by England. These include:

  • Establish Local Skills Improvement Plans (LSIPs) across the country, aimed at making “technical skills training more relevant to local needs” [1]
  • Nine new employer-led Institutes of Technology (IoT) launched to build technical skills in STEM subjects [2]
  • Develop Higher Technical Qualifications (HTQs) in collaboration with employers to help learners acquire the skills they need for their chosen career
  • Offer a Loan for Life (LLE) entitlement, which provides funding for up to the equivalent of four years of study after age 18

According to the report, these policies represent a much-needed boost to the UK’s creaky adult technical education sector. Without a joint approach, however, researchers fear that these initiatives will have no real impact.

Professor Helen Marshall, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Salford, explains why:

“Increasing the rate of participation in higher technical education will be essential to closing skills gaps in key sectors, stimulating economic growth and improving opportunities throughout the country. However, there are obstacles to this. There is a lack of understanding among students, teachers and employers about what higher technical education is and why it is valuable, and there is a lower level of perceived erroneous prestige associated with these courses compared to to other branches of higher education.

“At Salford, we are committed to working with continuing education providers and employers to increase all pathways to higher education, including higher, graduate and diploma technical apprenticeships and three-year diplomas. I welcome the release of this report today, which makes a number of sensible recommendations to boost higher technical education in the UK.

This problem was also recognized in the Augar Review, which stated that the technical education system after 18 years has suffered over time “a loss of status and prestige among learners, employers and the general public” . [3].

To address this issue, the report recommends that the government expand its current efforts to promote EHT by implementing a program under which institutes of technology (IoT) would receive funding to conduct their own promotional campaigns. This would help by tailoring information campaigns to particular contexts, as IoT can draw on their knowledge of the local economic and social context.

In addition, the government could launch two separate national information campaigns promoting EHT: one aimed at learners aged 16-18, and the other aimed at employers and experienced workers wishing to upgrade. or recycle.

Among the report’s other recommendations for reforming HTE are measures to enhance its prestige in the education sector:

  • Commit to new rounds of funding for IoT that are able to demonstrate that they have a positive effect in supporting local specialties and economic clusters
  • Offering a flexible lifetime loan entitlement which a) is available to HTE on an equal basis to full degrees, b) removes the ELQ rule, allowing learners to fund qualifications at a lower level than those they currently hold, and c) ensures that LLE is additional to any student loans already held by individuals
  • Enable access to maintenance support funding for HTE students. Making maintenance funding available on an equal basis would send a clear message that society values ​​time spent on technical education as much as time spent on degrees.
  • Improve career choices, information, advice and guidance at all ages for higher technical options after age 16. In particular, learners would benefit from having more details on student funding, the link between employers and HTQs/IoT, the full range of HTE qualifications available, and the relative merits of each type.

ResPublica Director Phillip Blond explains the importance of technical skills in improving education in the UK:

Higher technical education has much to offer learners, both early in life and at various stages of adulthood. It can provide practical skills for the workplace and for life in less time than a full honors degree, while providing a stepping stone to the pursuit of higher education for those who want it. Upgrading this sector will help more people gain the skills they need to find better paying, personally rewarding and socially beneficial work.

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